The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast (podcast episodes)
The Partially Examined Life is a philosophy podcast by some guys who were at one point set on doing philosophy for a living but then thought better of it. Each episode, we pick a short text and chat about it with some balance between insight and flippancy. You don't have to know any philosophy, or even to have read the text we're talking about to (mostly) follow and (hopefully) enjoy the discussion. For links to the texts we discuss and other info, check out www.partiallyexaminedlife.com.
Continuing on Pierre Bourdieu's Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste (1979) with guest rock star Tim Quirk. More on Bourdieu's survey of musical tastes: People use tastes to distinguish themselves and assert social superiority. The Kantian, upper-class, art-for-art's-sake paradigm of taste rules out joining in a mosh pit, but are the Kantian and social types of artistic abandon really so distinct?
Direct download: PEL_ep_137pt2_3-28-16.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 7:00am CDT

On Pierre Bourdieu's Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste (1979), introduction, ch 1 through p. 63, conclusion, and postscript. How do our tastes in music, art, and everything else reflect our social position? This philosophically trained sociologist administered a few detailed questionnaires in 1960s France and used the resulting differences in what people in different classes preferred and how they talked about these preferences to theorize about the role that taste plays in our social games. Featuring guest Tim Quirk of Too Much Joy and recent guest on Mark's Nakedly Examined Music podcast.
Direct download: PEL_ep_137pt1_3-28-16.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 7:00am CDT

Continuing on Theodor Adorno's "The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception" (1944). We cover topics within art and entertainment like the role of style: You think you're being so original with your personal style, but Adorno sees you has having already been brainwashed into being a clone, so your "authentic" expression is anything but. Also, humor is not, as you might think, a way of bringing an audience together in solidarity, but is the "eruption of barbarism!" And sex in the popular culture: what a tease! Manufactured entertainment products can't even get tragedy right! They just condition us into accepting our crappy situation.
Direct download: PEL_ep_136pt2_3-6-16.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 7:00am CDT

On Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer's "The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception" from Dialectic of Enlightenment (1944), plus Adorno's "Culture Industry Reconsidered" (1963). How does the entertainment industry affect us? Adorno (armed with Marx and Freud) thinks that our "mass culture" is imposed from the top down to lull us into being submissive workers. Sponsored by Zero Books; please visit zero-books.net.
Direct download: PEL_ep_136pt1_3-6-16_zero-books.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 7:00am CDT

The last of our four releases on G.F.W. Hegel's Encyclopaedia Logic, this time giving Hegel's account of how Being supposedly leads, when you analyze the concept itself, to Nothingness, and then Becoming, Quality, and Quantity. And we also get Infinity in there, which is nice. End song: "Flow' by Gary Lucas with Mark Lint (2016). Listen to Mark interview Gary on Nakedly Examined Music.
Direct download: PEL_ep_135pt2_2-23-16.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 7:00am CDT

A whole second discussion on G.F.W. Hegel's Encylopedia Logic, hitting sections 78–99 on the dialectic and Understanding vs. Reason. Hegel thinks we can use Reason to objectively come up with basic metaphysical categories, but can we really? With guest Amogh Sahu.
Direct download: PEL_ep_135pt1_2-23-16.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 7:00am CDT

More on Hegel's The Science of Logic (1812–1816), §1–§129. We continue trying to make sense of Hegel's method and purpose: How does he think that we can deduce metaphysics? How would we even start? Hegel's view is that contra Kant, we do in fact come in contact with reality, at least when we think hard and systematically enough. And he's going to tell us how to do just that. With guest Amogh Sahu.
Direct download: PEL_ep_134pt2_2-16-16.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 6:00am CDT

On G.F.W. Hegel's The Science of Logic (1812–1816), §1–§129 and The Encyclopaedia Logic (1817) §1–§25. "Logic" for Hegel isn't about symbolic logic; it's about how thought interacts with the world. Our thoughts about fundamental metaphysical categories bear the same relations to each other as the the categories themselves do. Just take Hegel's many, many words for it! With guest Amogh Sahu.
Direct download: PEL_ep_134pt1_2-16-16.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 6:00am CDT

Welcome to Nakedly Examined Music, our first spin-off of PEL. Hear more at nakedlyexaminedmusic.com or find it via iTunes. Mark interviews songwriters about why and how they do what they do. Think of it as applied philosophy. Four episodes are now posted; this cross-post of our pilot features David Lowery of Camper van Beethoven and Cracker talking through three of his songs. He's as well-spoken and full of ideas as many a decent philosopher, so sit back and turn on your active listening function!
Direct download: PELSpecial_NEM_ep_001_12-23-15.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 9:36pm CDT

Continuing on Fromm's The Art of Loving (1956). We talk about love as requiring knowledge: as "knowing the secret" of humanity or at least being interested. This is related to sadism. Is there a difference between motherly and fatherly love? Fromm thinks so. He also talks about different degrees of maturity in one's belief in God, the best being God as equivalent to the world and love of God as love of humanity, i.e., orientation toward the good. Finally, we get Fromm on society: How could we reform norms so that love can be the norm?
Direct download: PEL_ep_133pt2_1-26-16.mp3
Category:Podcast Episodes -- posted at: 6:00am CDT